Briana C.

Founder, Branch Legal LLC
Member Since: February 15, 2021
Boston, MA

Briana C. is now available for hire

Summary info

Hourly Rate
$350
State License
CA, MA, NY
Years Practicing
12
Insurance
Yes
General
Legal Packages
Client Feedback
Legal Answers
Biography
Platform Experience
Employment
Education
Project Preferences
Languages
Prenuptial Agreement
Pre- or Postnuptial Agreement

$1,800

3-day delivery

What's included:

  • Discussion of desired terms.
  • Draft of agreement.
  • Reasonable revisions to draft.
  • Advising on applicable law.
  • Client questions and follow-up.
Employment Contract
Employment Agreement

$950

5-day delivery

What's included:

  • Discussing desired terms and context with client.
  • Drafting employment agreement.
  • Explaining agreement and applicable law to client.
  • Reasonable revisions to agreement.
Employment Contract
Independent Contractor

$950

5-day delivery

What's included:

  • Discussing desired terms and context with client.
  • Drafting independent contractor agreement.
  • Explaining agreement and applicable law to client.
  • Reasonable revisions to agreement.
Employment
Employee Onboarding

$2,000

5-day delivery

What's included:

  • Employment offer letter.
  • Employment agreement.
  • Non-disclosure agreement.
  • Restrictive covenants.
  • Employee handbook.
  • Legal notices required for employees.
  • Up to 60min of advice on compliance with employer legal requirements.
Independent Contractor
Independent Contractor Onboarding

$1,200

5-day delivery

What's included:

  • Independent contractor agreement.
  • Non-disclosure agreement.
  • Restrictive covenants.
  • Up to 60min of advice on compliance with applicable legal requirements.
General Counsel
Outside General Counsel

$2,000

Immediate Start

What's included:

  • Contract review & drafting.
  • Manufacturing agreements.
  • Employee handbooks.
  • Financing agreements.
  • Data privacy compliance.
  • Distribution agreements.
  • Professional services agreements.
  • Software/technology agreements.
  • Licensing agreements.
  • Employment agreements.
  • Independent contractor agreements.
  • Severence agreemenrts.
Website Terms
Website Package

$1,750

5-day delivery

What's included:

  • Privacy policy
  • Terms of use
  • Disclaimer

Client Feedback

54 Feedback Items Collected

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4 Questions Answered / 4 Recent Answers
May 23, 2023
A: A prenuptial agreement does not create an estate plan. But it can do two things. First, a prenuptial agreement can create a contractual promise on the part of one or both spouses to do something in particular with their estate plan (such as promising to leave the marital home to the surviving spouse, or promising to leave everything they have to the surviving spouse, or promising to set up a trust, etc. etc.). If this contractual promise is broken, the surviving spouse has a contract claim against the estate of the dead spouse. Second, and almost the opposite, in a prenuptial agreement one or both spouses can waive the rights they would otherwise have by statute, thus freeing up the other spouse to do whatever he or she wants with her estate plan. Without a prenuptial agreement, a surviving spouse is entitled by statute to inherit a certain proportion of the estate of the dead spouse (the exact proportion depends on whether or not the dead spouse has a will, and/or has surviving children). The prenuptial agreement can override these statutory rights and provide that the surviving spouse is not entitled to inherit anything from the dead spouse, except for anything the dead spouse may choose to leave the surviving spouse in his or her will.
April 25, 2023
A: A prenuptial agreement does not in itself affect how taxing authorities will treat the spouses. But it can create promises between the spouses toward one another. For example, it may create a promise to file jointly, or specify that they are making no such promise. And it can create a promise by each spouse to pay the other back for any taxes the other pays on his or spouse's behalf. The decision whether to file jointly or separately does have tax implications with taxing authorities.
April 25, 2023
A: Judges in most cases honor and enforce (signed and notarized) prenuptial agreements between two spouses as long as both parties entered it freely and voluntarily and with full knowledge of one another financial circumstances, and the agreement is not "unconscionable." A prenuptial agreement may not be enforced if (1) either party signed it under duress or coercion or undue pressure (or, say, the night before the wedding), (2) the party seeking to enforce it did not truthfully and completely disclose their financial information, or (3) enforcing the prenup would leave one spouse so destitute that they could not meet their most basic living expenses (i.e., would be forced onto welfare). In short, the prenuptial agreement will be enforced if (1) all the procedural requirements were met at the time it was signed and (2) the terms are not unconscionable, taking into account the circumstances existing at the time of divorce.
July 8, 2022
A: For a small service business with no outside investors, the LLC form probably offers you more advantages than the corporation. (For example, LLCs offer greater flexibility, fewer corporate formalities, and pass-through taxation which is especially beneficial in the early stages of an LLC if you have other income sources.) The S-Corp election does not affect your choice of entity (LLC or corporation). Either kind of entity can make the S-Corp election, which just tells the IRS how you should be taxed. You can form an LLC at the beginning and make the S-Corp election for that LLC in the future, if and when it makes sense (you will still be an LLC then, but an S-Corp for tax purposes only). The S-Corp election only makes sense to do once your net profits reach a certain level. The purpose of the S-Corp election is to reduce your taxes. Filing the S-Corp election is not itself very expensive, but you will need to incur the costs of running payroll. (LLCs don't have to run payroll.)