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Draft Convertible Note in Florida

How much does it cost to draft a Convertible Note in Florida? Below are summary details about a user that needed to draft a Convertible Note in Florida. This cost data comes directly from ContractsCounsel's online marketplace. The user received 5 bids to draft the Convertible Note at a pricing range of $450 - $1,500 on a flat fee. The data includes project specifications and Convertible Note pricing. To review more pricing data, visit Convertible Note pricing.
Service type
Draft
Document type
Convertible Note
Location
Florida
Client type
Personal
Client industry
-
Deadline
A week
Pricing Range
$450 - $1,500 (Flat fee)
Number of Bids
5 bids

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Lawyers that Bid on this Convertible Note Project

Founding Member/Attorney

(46)

10 years practicing

Free consultation

Convertible Note
Get Free Proposal
$350/h

Partner

(45)

13 years practicing

Free consultation

Convertible Note
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$225/h

Principal Attorney

(12)

26 years practicing

Free consultation

Convertible Note
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$400/h

Partner/Attorney at Law

(47)

16 years practicing

Free consultation

Convertible Note
Get Free Proposal
$350/h

Other Lawyers that Help with Florida Projects

Managing Partner

(1)

15 years practicing

Free consultation

Get Free Proposal
$300/h

Owner / Attorney

(3)

6 years practicing

Free consultation

Get Free Proposal
$400/h

Attorney

(7)

3 years practicing

Free consultation

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$300/h

Owner

(3)

8 years practicing

Free consultation

Get Free Proposal
$400/h

Other Lawyers that Help with Convertible Note Projects

Attorney

(1)

14 years practicing

Free consultation

Convertible Note
Get Free Proposal
$275/h

Attorney

(6)

6 years practicing

Free consultation

Convertible Note
Get Free Proposal
$250/h

Managing Partner

(50)

5 years practicing

Free consultation

Convertible Note
Get Free Proposal
$395/h

Counsel

(39)

10 years practicing

Free consultation

Convertible Note
Get Free Proposal
$150/h

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Forum Questions About Convertible Note

Convertible Note

California

Asked on Mar 3, 2021

Convertible note vs. equity financing?

I am an entrepreneur and I am in the process of raising capital for my startup. I am considering both convertible note and equity financing options and am trying to decide which one is best suited for my company. I need to understand the key differences between the two options to make an informed decision.

Thaddeus W.

Answered Mar 3, 2021

Good question. Convertible notes (as well as SAFE's, discussed below) differ from equity in several respects. The most fundamental difference is that a convertible note is debt. A second major difference is that, although the note is debt, its terms include the noteholder's right to acquire an equity position in the future; if a certain event later occurs (defined in the note, but typically the sale of preferred stock to a future investor (e.g. a venture capital firm), but also a sale of the company can have a similar effect), this will trigger the note to convert into equity and the note is "satisfied" ... that is, the debt is extinguished when the note converts and the holder thereby becomes an equity holder (typically coming to own shares of preferred stock very similar to that issued to the future investors in that triggering event). These two differences are related to a third. A convertible note is often issued without a valuation of the company. For example, when a startup business has no operating history, it is impossible for the startup founders or the investor to decide what the company is worth. Equity cannot be issued for a fair market value (FMV), since there is no basis to determine what the FMV is. A convertible note resolves that by giving the investor (the note holder) the right to convert the note into equity later on, when another investor and the company can agree on a company valuation. In other words, the convertible note allows the company to "kick the can (of valuation) down the road" to be dealt with at another time. But, since a convertible note is debt, is has a repayment provision, and normally carries interest. This means that the note is carried on the company's balance sheet as debt, and presents the company with the future obligation to repay the note if a conversion event has not happened before the note's maturity date. So, SAFE's are often used, especially now that they have become so familiar to investors. (SAFE stands for Simple Agreement for Future Equity). Essentially, as SAFE is a convertible note without the debt features. A SAFE carries no interest and does not have to be repaid. The investor in a SAFE will normally be sophisticated and able to assess the chances the company will do well enough for a conversion event (the issuance of preferred stock, or a sale of the company) to result in the investor's SAFE converting, and thus give the investor comfort that would otherwise be lacking in an instrument that has no repayment obligation. Like a convertible note, a SAFE kicks the can of valuation down the road, where a valuation can later be determined by the company and a future investor. Founders should exercise caution in issuing convertible notes or SAFE's. Among other reasons, founders commonly do not appreciate the impact that convertible notes or SAFE's can have on the founders' own ownership. Convertible notes and SAFE's often include a feature called a "valuation cap." This can result in surprising dilution, as well as the issuance of equity to the converting note or SAFE holder at what is effectively a very low price per share, costing the company far more than the founders may have expected. Also, notes and SAFE's with very similar, but different, terms can result in a complicated capitalization table, making negotiations with venture capital firms later on more difficult, an equity transaction more complex, and thus the process more time-consuming and (therefore) more expensive.

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Convertible Note

Ohio

Asked on Mar 3, 2021

Can a convertible note be transferred?

I am a startup founder and I am considering using a convertible note to raise capital. I am aware that convertible notes are agreements between investors and startups, but I'm not sure if they can be transferred to other investors. I need to know if this is possible so that I can make an informed decision about the best way to raise capital for my business.

Paul S.

Answered Mar 3, 2021

It depends on the terms of the convertible note. If you don't want it to be transferable, then you should include a provision in the note prohibiting transfers, assignments, etc.

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