Disclaimer

Jump to Section

Need help with a Disclaimer?

CREATE A FREE PROJECT POSTING
Post Project Now

Disclaimers are a great way to mitigate risk. When you operate as a business, you assume a lot of legal responsibility, whether online or not. Shift some of the liability back to your customers, especially for situations beyond your control.

In this article, we’ve shared what business owners should know about disclaimers in general:

What is a Disclaimer?

Disclaimers are legal texts that offer businesses protection from legal liability. They shield a company from legal claims associated with user and third-party risk. In general, customers must agree to all terms and conditions before using a product or service.

Here is an article which also defines disclaimers.

What is a Disclaimer Used For?

A disclaimer is used to protect your company from claims. You can utilize a disclaimer to limit the scope of your rights and responsibilities. Both parties can exercise and enforce these terms in a contractual relationship.

A disclaimer is also vital to protect you from third-party claims. They’ll let your users know that you’re not responsible for any damages related to the use of your website, services, products, and those with whom you affiliate.

What a Disclaimer Doesn’t Cover

If a consumer files a legal claim against your company, your disclaimers will provide you with the legal lifeline you need. However, disclaimers don’t shield you from acts of gross negligence.

For example, if you’re a SaaS provider, you must ensure that you’re working in good faith to guarantee system uptime. This guarantee means that you’re upgrading equipment, conducting routine maintenance, and more. Customers can hold you liable for their associated losses when the system goes down too frequently due to carelessness.

Meet some lawyers on our platform

Tim E.

22 projects on CC
View Profile

Ashley H.

19 projects on CC
View Profile

Mark D.

11 projects on CC
View Profile

Richard N.

31 projects on CC
View Profile

Types of Disclaimers

Contract law offers flexibility when it comes to using disclaimers. As such, there are several types of disclaimers that a business might want to know about and use.

Below, we’ve described ten different types of disclaimers:

Type 1. Third-Party Disclaimers

Most websites include links to other websites or services. It’s a way for the website to earn credibility, increase traffic, or build a brand.

These “third-party services” usually sponsor affiliate links strategically to generate revenue. This disclaimer informs users that your site contains third-party links, and users click them at their own risk.

Type 2. Warranty Disclaimers

Websites most often use warranty disclaimers. These disclaimers state what the website does and does not promise to users. They also acknowledge that you aren’t responsible for claims arising from service unavailability.

Type 3. Limitation of Liability Disclaimers

A limitation of liability specifies the extent of your responsibilities and obligations. This disclaimer is essential for safeguarding your website if a user encounters issues while using your site. Limitation of liability disclaimers make it clear that subsequent damages are not your fault.

Type 4. Industry-Specific Disclaimers

Industry-specific disclaimers do not apply to all websites. Think about including industry-specific disclaimers if you have a website or blog that offers tips, advice, or sells products in:

  • Finance
  • Law
  • Medical

Governing bodies and associations generally determine which disclaimers are necessary. Check with their offices if you have questions about your requirements.

Type 5. Shipping Disclaimers

Shipping disclaimers are for eCommerce websites that ship their products to customers. A shipping disclaimer limits your liability when something goes wrong, such as damage and delays, beyond your control.

Type 6. Product Return Disclaimers

Product return disclaimers, like shipping disclaimers, outline restrictions that apply to customer returns and exchanges. For eCommerce stores, it’s a must-have.

They’re usually found in a Return Policy. Some stores have many restrictions, while others have few. Others, such as final sale items, allow returns, and others don’t.

Type 7. Expressed Opinions Disclaimer

Expressed opinions disclaimers inform users that the author’s views and opinions are solely their own. They generally release a publisher from claims. Otherwise, readers might reasonably assume the opposite.

Type 8. Past Performance Disclaimer

Past performance disclaimers protect a company from former outcomes. For example, diet supplements may describe an average weight loss for a control group but don’t guarantee the same results for every customer. While the product or service works as intended, a company cannot become liable for every failure.

Type 9. Professional Advice Disclaimers

Advice from authors, doctors, lawyers, accountants, and business owners use disclaimers to protect themselves from specific legal actions. Professional advice disclaimers are helpful if users misinterpret published materials as guidance for their unique situation.

Many businesses purchase general or professional liability insurance to protect them after being hired. Your insurance company may require your customers to sign a release of liability with a release clause for enforceability purposes.

Type 10. Errors & Omissions (E&O) Disclaimers

Another major issue that many unwitting website owners face is accuracy. It’s common to publish factual errors and misleading content, but it exposes you to liability even when it’s unintentional. Use an errors & omissions disclaimer to protect you from these types of claims.

ContractsCounsel Disclaimer Image

Image via Pexels by Karolina

What’s Typically Included in Disclaimer Language?

Disclaimer language typically includes terms and conditions that limit company liability. However, it’s hard to imagine what that looks like if it’s your first time drafting one.

Every disclaimer is unique, which means that the language in each one is different. As such, the best approach understands what type of disclaimer you need and shaping it based on the principles below:

Relevant Terms and Conditions

Disclaimer language typically includes information that is suitable for the specific situation. It should also be relevant to the end-user or customer.

Clear Legal Language

It’s wise to make your disclaimer clauses unambiguous. There’s an ongoing misnomer that complicated agreements are better. This assertion isn’t true.

Transparent terms and conditions help users quickly find information that they need. This simple feature alone can avoid many future problems.

Application Matters

It would help if you also prioritized a full review of your disclaimers before publishing. Analyze the text to ensure that words cannot be misapplied or misunderstood.

People often misinterpret information, which isn’t your fault, but you can lessen the chance of dealing with a complaint in the first place.

Fact-Based Wording

Ensure that your disclaimers are factual. You also can’t apply disclaimers to non-legitimate business purposes and still expect them to achieve enforceability. Write your disclaimers so that they are accurate, honest, and fact-based.

Disclaimer Examples

Knowing which type of disclaimer to use is one of the most challenging aspects of using one. How would you know if you have the right kind? We recommend, at a minimum, reviewing real-life disclaimer examples to help you solidify your understanding, especially for more complicated situations.

Here’s an example of how a lawyer would apply a disclaimer to their website:

  • Marc is a lawyer in New Mexico
  • He is building a website for his law firm
  • Marc plans to share legal information that attracts website visitors
  • He’s concerned about visitors interpreting his website as legal advice
  • Marc limits his liability by placing a disclaimer in the footer of his website
  • He decides to use an industry-specific disclaimer for lawyers
  • The legal industry uses professional advice disclaimers in general
  • Visitors understand that they may not sue Marc for his website content when he applies a professional advice disclaimer to his website

Take the guesswork out of creating a disclaimer. Hire business lawyers or contract lawyers to help you draft your to help you prepare a myriad of liability waivers .

They’ll not only help you work through crucial legal issues, but they’ll also help you handle the process entirely. From offering thoughts on a consent form to the contract signing, speak with a legal professional for the best result.

Get Help with a Disclaimer

Do you need help creating or implementing a disclaimer?

Post a project in ContractsCounsel’s marketplace to get bids from lawyers for the work. All lawyers are vetted by our team and peer reviewed by customers for you to explore before hiring.

How ContractsCounsel Works
Hiring a lawyer on ContractsCounsel is easy, transparent and affordable.
1. Post a Free Project
Complete our 4-step process to provide info on what you need done.
2. Get Bids to Review
Receive flat-fee bids from lawyers in our marketplace to compare.
3. Start Your Project
Securely pay to start working with the lawyer you select.

Meet some of our Disclaimer Lawyers

ContractsCounsel verified
Self Employed
11 years practicing
Free Consultation

I have practiced law in foreign jurisdiction for more than 11 years and more than one year in Texas. I am Texas licensed attorney. Practice areas include Corporate: incorporation of business entities, drafting of operating agreements, by-laws, and business contracts; Commercial: business disputes, demand letters, cease and desist lettera, dealing with insurance companies, negotiations, settlements of disputes, commercial real estate, and business litigation Litigation: business disputes, personal injury, civil rights, cross-border matters, maritime matters, drafting of litigation pleadings, motion practice, legal research, white-collar defense.

ContractsCounsel verified
Attorney
38 years practicing
Free Consultation

Mr. LaRocco's focus is business law, corporate structuring, and contracts. He has a depth of experience working with entrepreneurs and startups, including some small public companies. As a result of his business background, he has not only acted as general counsel to companies, but has also been on the board of directors of several and been a business advisor and strategist. Some clients and projects I have recently done work for include a hospitality consulting company, a web development/marketing agency, a modular home company, an e-commerce consumer goods company, an online ordering app for restaurants, a music file-sharing company, a company that licenses its photos and graphic images, a video editing company, several SaaS companies, a merchant processing/services company, a financial services software company that earned a licensing and marketing contract with Thomson Reuters, and a real estate software company.

ContractsCounsel verified
Director
7 years practicing
Free Consultation

We are a boutique legal practice focused on media, fintech and international trade and have significant experience of advising on high value matters in these areas and delivering results. We advise start-ups, established businesses and professionals on a wide range of commercial and corporate arrangements, not only in the UK, but also in the European Union, United States and Latin America.

ContractsCounsel verified
Owner
12 years practicing
Free Consultation

Talin has over a decade of focused experience in business and international law. She is fiercely dedicated to her clients, thorough, detail-oriented, and gets the job done.

ContractsCounsel verified
Attorney Advisor
7 years practicing
Free Consultation

Former litigation attorney, current owner and co-founder of a documentary and scripted film and television production company. Well versed in small business foundation, entertainment and IP-related issues, as well as general business contracts.

ContractsCounsel verified
Attorney
5 years practicing
Free Consultation

I have been practicing law for more than 4 years at a small firm in York County, Maine. I recently decided to hang my shingle, Dirigo Law LLC. My practice focuses mostly on Real Estate / Corporate transactions, Wills, Trusts, and Probate matters.

ContractsCounsel verified
Managing Partner
23 years practicing
Free Consultation

Tim has 20 years of experience representing a wide variety of emerging and established companies in the technology, software, bitcoin and professional services industries. He works directly with his clients’ executives and boards of directors on corporate, intellectual property, and securities law issues. Recently, Tim has advised clients on Series A and Series B financings, corporate structuring, complex video licensing agreements, and structuring new hedge funds. Tim previously served as Forrester Research, Inc.’s General Counsel and Secretary where he was chief legal officer, led the company’s legal group, and managed the company’s legal and regulatory affairs. Tim played an integral role in the company’s initial public offering in 1997 and coordinated its secondary offering in 2000. He directed the legal process in the company’s acquisitions of Giga Information Group, Inc., Fletcher Research and Forit GmbH and oversaw over $125million in transactions. He also managed the company’s intellectual property assets. Tim is admitted to practice in Massachusetts and New York. Tim holds a Juris Doctor degree from the Boston College Law School and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Trinity College

Find the best lawyer for your project

Browse Lawyers Now

Want to speak to someone?

Get in touch below and we will schedule a time to connect!

Request a call