Private Placement Memorandum

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Do you need to quickly and flexibly raise capital for your business or startup?

There are sophisticated investors in the market who want to know everything about your financial performance with a private placement memorandum. Also known as a PPM, a private placement memorandum helps you dodge some regulatory requirements while raising capital and equity with accredited investors quickly.

However, you should approach your PPMs with a comprehensive understanding of how they work. The article below covers everything that you need to know.

What is a Private Placement Memorandum?

A private placement memorandum, also known as an offering document and offering memorandum, is a financial legal documents that companies use to attract prospective investors. It offers information about the company selling securities and related terms and conditions according to the Securities Act of 1993. This information helps investors perform their due diligence towards their stakeholders.

Benefits of private placement memorandums include:

  1. Issuer not subject to the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) regulations
  2. Ability to raise capital quickly
  3. Lower costs versus preparing a prospectus
  4. Permissible to maintain confidentiality
  5. Can raise smaller amounts from a large pool of investors
  6. Private placement markets are considered more stable versus common stock
  7. Personalized options and flexibility

There are several key advantages associated with private placement memoranda. They can help your organization or startup raise capital. However, there are disadvantages to using PPMs as well, so way your options carefully.

Here is an article about the Securities Act of 1993.

Purpose of a Private Placement Memorandum

The purpose of a private placement memorandum is to help investors understand the investment security or instrument. Smaller and emerging markets, typically involving startups, utilize a PPM when raising capital from a specific group of people. These individuals tend to be high net worth institutional investors.

Examples of when to use private placement memoranda include:

  • Example 1 . Raising business capital for a startup
  • Example 2 . Taking advantage of fraud protection statutes
  • Example 3 . Offerings above $5 million with unaccredited investors
  • Example 4 . Soliciting angel investors with a formal approach
  • Example 5 . Negotiating with a large group of investors over fixed terms
  • Example 6 . Investing with a lead investor or smaller markets

As you can see, a PPM is not right for everything situation. However, they are helpful when raising capital. You should seek immediate, in-state legal advice if you are still trying to decide if this approach is right for you.

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Types of Private Placement Memoranda

While private placement memoranda are used to raise capital, they also come in many forms. Several company types can sell unregistered securities versus going through an initial public offering (IPO). For the best result, use the PPM type that is right for your situation.

Types of private placement memoranda include:

  • Corporation common stock sales
  • Count financing authority bond sales
  • Mutual fund shares held in trust
  • Limited liability company (LLC) promissory notes
  • Mortgage broker business notes

If you are thinking about using private placements to raise money, you must draft a PPM that complies with current regulations. You have the right to use private placements, but only if you meet specific conditions. Otherwise, you could be on the hook for SEC violations.

Key Parts of a Private Placement Memorandum

Private placement memoranda are formal documents. They are not a business plan since they do not address the business entirely. The most critical point to drive home if you draft a PPM is to ensure that it complies with SEC requirements and that you follow them carefully.

Key parts of a private placement memorandum include:

Part 1. Investors’ notice

The investors noticed should outline important disclosures that prospective investors anticipate seeing. Some common investors’ notices include high-degree of risk, securities transfer restrictions, and company rights. These notices are generally offered following the rules and regulations of the SEC.

Part 2. Executive summary

An executive summary is a letter to the investors that summarize the PPM and point out other critical details. The executive summary should be crafted to entice investors. You should share the top three most important information you want to share so that they can refer to them later quickly.

Part 3. Overview and purpose

The overview and purpose section allows you to introduce your organization and describe what you are using the proceeds for. You can also share your market knowledge, planned operations, and SWOT analysis results. This part will give investors an understanding of who you are, your company’s greater purpose, and how you plan to move ahead.

Part 4. Terms and conditions

The terms and conditions of your PPM are critical to learning about how the deal is structured, including your dilution and dividend policy. Other elements to address include voting rights, liquidation rights, and information rights. If you hire an attorney, they will provide you with a checklist of considerations regarding this section of your private placement memorandum.

Part 5. Risk factors

Risk factors are the most component of your PPM. Potential investors may skip to the section immediately to learn about your company’s risk factors. Statements related to risk should be short, simple, and in bold typeface.

Part 6. Financial Statements

Your financial statements and a summary therein share with investors how your company has performed in the past. This section can signal to investors that you can turn a vision into a reality, which is an attractive attribute. Your accountant can provide you with the necessary financial statements that you will need.

Part 7. Use of Proceeds

The second most important section is how you plan to use the capital raised. Break your anticipated expenses down into several categories. These categories should match the ones contained within your pro forma documents .

Also, it is worth sharing that the Securities and Exchange Commission routinely warns investors about the warning signs of a potentially fraudulent investment scam or scheme. If your PPM is poorly written, formatted, or generally sloppy, you could turn prospective investors away. Inattention to detail is a significant red flag to an investor.

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Private Placement Memorandum vs. Prospectus

The difference between a private placement memorandum vs. prospectus is that a private placement memorandum explains the terms and conditions of a private placement. A prospectus is an offering document that performs the same function but for publicly traded issues, such as companies selling common stock or introducing an IPO. Given you can buy the share in the public markets, there is no need for details about the terms and conditions.

Get Help with Private Placement Memoranda

For the best result, draft a PPM with business lawyers . They will help you avoid legal mistakes while maximizing your opportunities. Errors can result in expensive consequences and fines in the future, which means you should seek legal advice before utilizing a PPM, prospectus, or other offering documents.

Knowledge and Skills

Business attorneys are well-suited to guide you through the process. They have the knowledge, training, and skills that you want when approaching investors. Solo practitioners and small firms in your state can offer personalized attention, competitive rates, and institutional knowledge.

Personalized Attention

Another benefit of business attorneys is that they offer full-service, personalized attention. They can field calls, write letters, discuss your objectives, and answer questions on-demand. Solo practitioners generally can customize their offerings quickly versus large law firms.



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