ContractsCounsel Logo

Securities Lawyers

Meet some of our Securities Lawyers

Sara S. on ContractsCounsel
View Sara
4.9 (85)
Member Since:
July 14, 2023

Sara S.

Attorney
Free Consultation
Washington, D.C.
4 Yrs Experience
Licensed in DC, MD
American University Washington College of Law

With over ten years of intellectual property experience, I’m happy to work on your contractual matter. I am very diligent and enjoy meeting tight deadlines. Drafting memoranda, business transactional documents, termination notices, demand letters, licenses and letter agreements are all in my wheelhouse! Working in a variety of fields, from construction to pharmaceutical, I enjoy resolving any disputes that come across my desk.

Rob D. on ContractsCounsel
View Rob
Member Since:
July 8, 2023

Rob D.

Attorney
Free Consultation
Bluffton, SC
10 Yrs Experience
Licensed in SC
University of Dayton School of Law

Attorney with 10 years experience focusing on corporate transactions and formations, real estate, and estate planning.

Christi H. on ContractsCounsel
View Christi
Member Since:
July 8, 2023

Christi H.

attorney
Free Consultation
Richmond, VA
19 Yrs Experience
Licensed in VA
Regent Law School

I have been practicing law for 18 years. I have worked in a mid-size firm environment where I was named a partner in 2014. In 2016, I left to start my own practice and work part-time. I handle most all corporate and transactional work and serve has outside general counsel for a number of companies

Kennedy W. on ContractsCounsel
View Kennedy
Member Since:
July 11, 2023

Kennedy W.

Attorney
Free Consultation
Holton, KS
5 Yrs Experience
Licensed in KS
Washburn University School of Law

Graduated from Washburn University School of Law with certificates in Tax Law and Business Transactions. Served as a specialized tax advisor and business consultant to clients across the nation over the last 8 years. I have practiced law since 2019, specializing in entity formations, contract drafting, contract review, contract disputes, business transactions, demand letters, legal research, and general business consulting.

Matt T. on ContractsCounsel
View Matt
Member Since:
July 31, 2023

Matt T.

Attorney
Free Consultation
Dallas, TX
2 Yrs Experience
Licensed in TX
Samford University's Cumberland School of Law

Matt is a licensed attorney based out of Dallas, Texas. Despite having recently graduated, Matt has been immersed in the world of Corporate law throughout law school and beyond. As a result, he has benefitted from the unique and advantageous position of experiencing and working on a wide array of matters, such as reviewing, drafting and negotiating contracts, overseeing regulatory compliance, business formation, risk management, and much more. Contact Matt today for a free consultation!

Penny R. on ContractsCounsel
View Penny
Member Since:
July 14, 2023

Penny R.

Founder/Owner
Free Consultation
Dallas, Texas
37 Yrs Experience
Licensed in TX
Southern Methodist University

I have practiced law for more than 35 years in the State of Texas. I am proud of the relationships I have formed with my clients and the high level of legal advice I have provided over these many years. I am responsive and will promptly address your particular situation. For 35 years I have counseled individuals, partnerships and corporations with regard to business formation, real estate transactions and issues, employer/employee relationships, contracts, estate planning and asset protection. I am licensed to practice law in all state courts in Texas and all federal courts. I have represented plaintiffs and defendants throughout the state in cases ranging from contract disputes to injury claims. I have worked with every type of business you can imagine from individuals to "mom and pop" businesses and businesses with assets of more than $10,000,000. My clients' businesses range from large construction contractors, investment companies, oil and gas companies, and commercial landlords, to name a few.

Find the best lawyer for your project

Browse Lawyers Now

Securities Legal Questions and Answers

Securities

LLC Operating Agreement

Texas

Asked on Aug 24, 2021

Can an LLC buy stocks for a fee?

I'm forming an LLC in order to manage some money investing in the stock market, (Friends and family only) I will be charging a percentage fee on the profits. Can an LLC be formed to invest in stocks and charge a performance fee? Thank you.

Forest H.

Answered Aug 25, 2021

Generally, if you are "advising others regarding investment decisions for compensation" you are regulated by the SEC as an investment advisor and subject to oversight and registration with the SEC. There are exemptions, for example, a "Family Office" is not required to register. However, all investors and owners in a Family Office must be actual family and friends would be excluded.

Read 1 attorney answer>

Securities

SAFE Note

California

Asked on Jul 13, 2023

SAFE Note interest accrual?

I am a business owner who recently completed a Series A round of funding. As part of this funding round, I issued SAFE Notes to my investors. I am now trying to understand the implications of these notes, specifically regarding interest accrual. I want to make sure I am compliant with all the terms of the SAFE Note agreement and understand the effects of interest accrual on my company's finances.

Thaddeus W.

Answered Aug 11, 2023

Thanks for the interesting question. There may be some conflation of issues here. A few points may help to clarify -- 1. A SAFE and a Note are different animals. Notes are debt instruments and, accordingly, usually have an interest component. SAFE's are not debt and so do not accrue interest. Convertible Notes and SAFE's are similar in that they both typically convert into preferred stock when the company **later** issues preferred stock. Also, Convertible Notes and SAFE's are often issued without regard to a company's then-current valuation. 2. You said your company issued SAFEs / Notes "as part of" a Series A funding. That's not legally impossible, of course, but it would be unusual, so it would be helpful to make sure we are using the same "glossary" of terms. Typically, the phrase "Series A funding" refers to a company's issuance of Series A Preferred Stock; such transactions involve putting a value on the company so that the Series A stock can be priced. Series A rounds often are preceded by the company issuing Convertible Notes or SAFE's without a valuation of the company (that is, the company and investors "kick the can down the road" to a later time when the company's operating history can justify a valuation). Then, when the Series A round occurs and shares of Series A are priced based on the company valuation, any pre-existing Convertible Notes and SAFE's convert into shares of Series A preferred stock at a conversion price that is equal to the price paid by the Series A purchasers, minus the discount that the Convertible Notes or SAFE's give to their holders. (NOTE: these days, often there is a round of preferred stock sold BEFORE Series A, called Series Seed. This is not required, but common. Sometimes SAFE's or Notes are issued between Series Seed and Series A, but, again, it would be the odd investor who purchased a SAFE or a Note in the same financing round in which preferred stock is sold.) 3. The implications of SAFE's and notes can be several. One of the biggest is their impact on the company's capitalization table ... that is, on the ownership interests of other shareholders, especially the founders. The terms of each Note or SAFE will determine their impact when they convert, especially if they have a "valuation cap" ... which is a provision by which an effective discount is given to the holder of the SAFE / Note. Valuation caps can result in more dilution to the founders and other pre-existing shareholders than they might expect, depending on the actual valuation of the company when these Convertible Notes and SAFE's do convert. 4. If you issued Convertible Notes or SAFE's as part of a Series A preferred stock round, the investors purchasing the Series A would have to have known about and approved of it. Their lawyers would have certainly raised eyebrows and asked questions. If these Convertible Notes / SAFE's were issued outside of the knowledge of the Series A investors, this would be expected to be problematic for the company, and possibly a breach of the Series A investment documents, or even a violation of certain securities laws. But, if all was approved by the investors, no problem. 5. Another implication worth noting is that since Convertible Notes are debt, they typically would be carried on (shown in) the company's balance sheet. Investors in Series A round always or nearly always have Information Rights to see the company's financial statements and be kept current on changes. Normally the company would have a contractual obligation to provide quarterly, if no monthly, financial reports and updates to Series A investors. These reports should include all information about SAFE's and Notes. 6. It should also be noted that Series A investment documents typically restrict the company from issuing many types of new securities without the approval of what these docs often call the "Requisite Holders." This is a defined term in the Series A investment docs (normally in the company amended and restated Charter), and is defined as the Series A holders that hold at least a stated number (e.g., a majority) of all of the Series A shares sold in the round. Note that these answers are not and should not be taken as legal advice for your particular situation. You should retain qualified legal counsel to have a formal lawyer-client relationship and your lawyer should review all relevant information. But, these concepts here are pretty fundamental. ~Thaddeus Wojcik, Wojcik Law Firm, PC

Read 1 attorney answer>

Securities

Revenue Sharing Agreement

California

Asked on Dec 2, 2021

How do you fund a restaurant?

I am looking for an attorney who can help me put together restaurant business proposal to funding to expand my restaurant branch.

Russell M.

Answered Dec 14, 2021

There is not a lot of detail here so I am going to assume you are not asking about how to get a small business loan, or you aren't interested or able to get SBA financing for what ever reason. If you have a successful restaurant concept, you might want to look into Regulation CF crowdfunding. I am aware of a number of food and beverage businesses that have leveraged their existing loyal and enthusiastic customer bases and a well executed financial and PR campaign to fund expansion sites.

Read 1 attorney answer>

Securities

SAFE Note

New York

Asked on Mar 30, 2021

What is the difference between a SAFE Note and Convertible Note?

I am considering raising money and have been advised to look at these two instruments to raise money on.

Ramsey T.

Answered Mar 30, 2021

Both SAFES (Simple Agreements for Equity) and Convertible Notes "convert" into equity. The fundamental difference between the two is that SAFES have no built-in interest rate and have no "end date." Convertible Notes are debt so they have an interest rate and after a certain period of time (perhaps two years in most cases) they can be "cashed in" by the holder who can force the start-up to pay back the investor (principal plus interest). SAFES have become very accepted in the investing community at this time and I always recommend that a start-up issue SAFES (and conversely I always recommend that an investor get a convertible note).

Read 1 attorney answer>

Securities

Stock Option Agreement

California

Asked on Jul 8, 2023

Stock option agreement and stock splits?

I am an employee of a company that is planning to offer stock options as part of my compensation package. I am trying to understand what would happen if my company does a stock split. Would my stock options be affected by the split, and if so, how? I want to make sure I understand the implications of a stock split before I accept the stock options as part of my compensation.

Thaddeus W.

Answered Aug 11, 2023

Good question! Typically, a stock split will result in an appropriate adjustment to an option award so that, after the adjustment, the option holder (you, in this case) is "made whole" -- that is, you are effectively in the same place economically (as far as this option is concerned) after the split with the option as you were before. If you look at your company's Stock Plan (the plan under which your options were authorized and granted to you), you will probably find a section called "Changes in Capitalization." (Or, you can search to document for the word "split" and may be able to find the governing provision that way.) The provision might be included in your Stock Option Agreement, but typically it is covered in the Plan. Anyway, the provision (wherever it is located in your documents) would normally say something along the lines of the following: "In the event of a stock split (and other events), the following will occur: (i) the numbers and class of shares covered by your option award, (ii) the exercise price per share of each outstanding option, and (iii) any applicable repurchase price per share issued under any option award, will be automatically proportionately adjusted in the event of a stock split (or other event)." (Usually the language is even more "legalesey" but that's pretty much the jist of it.) Of course, its impossible to say for sure in your situation (or in any other specific situation) without seeing the relevant documents and knowing all other relevant details, but that would be the typical approach.

Read 1 attorney answer>
See more legal questions…

Quick, user friendly and one of the better ways I've come across to get ahold of lawyers willing to take new clients.

View Trustpilot Review

How It Works

Post Your Project

Get Free Bids to Compare

Hire Your Lawyer

Clients Rate Lawyers 4.9 Stars
based on 11,549 reviews

Contracts Counsel was incredibly helpful and easy to use. I submitted a project for a lawyer's help within a day I had received over 6 proposals from qualified lawyers. I submitted a bid that works best for my business and we went forward with the project.

View Trustpilot Review

I never knew how difficult it was to obtain representation or a lawyer, and ContractsCounsel was EXACTLY the type of service I was hoping for when I was in a pinch. Working with their service was efficient, effective and made me feel in control. Thank you so much and should I ever need attorney services down the road, I'll certainly be a repeat customer.

View Trustpilot Review

I got 5 bids within 24h of posting my project. I choose the person who provided the most detailed and relevant intro letter, highlighting their experience relevant to my project. I am very satisfied with the outcome and quality of the two agreements that were produced, they actually far exceed my expectations.

View Trustpilot Review

How It Works

Post Your Project

Get Free Bids to Compare

Hire Your Lawyer

Clients Rate Lawyers 4.9 Stars
based on 11,549 reviews

Want to speak to someone?

Get in touch below and we will schedule a time to connect!

Request a call

Find lawyers and attorneys by city